Rethinking the Selection of AV Materials for Preservation and Access

Rethinking the Selection of AV Materials for Preservation and Access
James Lindner, Media Matters

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ABSTRACT

The sheer volume of legacy Analog electronic media stored in various formats and in a variety of conditions is a large obstacle in providing access to the content contained therein. This paper presents some alternative ideas in the Selection of AV material for Preservation and Access. Selection is one step in the very important process of determining what archives and collections keep, and what they do not keep. Productivity is important in the Selection process because of the sheer volume of materials. Accuracy of the eventual appraisal is important because materials retained represent a significant financial commitment – essentially forever. Content not chosen for retention will likely be destroyed. The presentation will examine the current workflow for Selection of legacy analog AV materials, and explores changing the workflow so that digitization occurs earlier. The result of this change is to allow many different tools, not available in an analog environment, to allow the Selection process to proceed faster and with higher accuracy. The approach offers potentially large benefits both in productivity and in the quality and accuracy of the results of the selection process.

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SPEAKER BIO

Jim Lindner, an internationally respected authority on the preservation and migration of magnetic media, is the Managing Member of Media Matters. Jim pioneered many of the techniques now commonly used for videotape restoration and has lectured widely and written about media preservation for the past twenty years. After founding the videotape restoration company VidiPax, he served as its president and executive director, stepping down after selling the company in 2001. He is a founding director of the National Television & Video Preservation Foundation and acted as a witness and panelist for the Library of Congress’ “The State of American Television.” Jim was twice a member of the board of the directors of the Association of Moving Image Archivists and FIAT. Currently, Jim sits on the Executive Board of SEAPAVAA and is the Chief Video Consultant for the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center at the Library of Congress. An active participant in SMPTE and ANSI standards committees, Jim has also served as Chairman of the Board of Anthology Film Archives.

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